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advanced_tools:group_theory [2018/04/13 07:42]
bogumilvidovic [Why is it interesting?]
advanced_tools:group_theory [2020/04/02 13:01] (current)
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 A square is defined mathematically as a set of points. A symmetry of the square is a transformation that maps this set of points into itself. This means concretely that by the transformation,​ no point is mapped to a point outside of the set that defines the square. A square is defined mathematically as a set of points. A symmetry of the square is a transformation that maps this set of points into itself. This means concretely that by the transformation,​ no point is mapped to a point outside of the set that defines the square.
  
-Obvious examples of such transformations are rotations, by $90^\circ$, $180^\circ$,​ $270^\circ$,​ and of course $0^\circ$.+Obvious examples of such transformations are rotations, by $90^{\circ}$, $180^{\circ}$, $270^{\circ}$, and of course $0^{\circ}$.
  
 {{ :​advanced_tools:​einheitsquadrat-gedreht22-150x150.png?​nolink|}} {{ :​advanced_tools:​einheitsquadrat-gedreht22-150x150.png?​nolink|}}
-A counter-example is a rotation by, say $5^\circ$. The upper-right corner point $A$ of the square is obviously mapped to a point $A'$ outside of the initial set. Of course, a square still looks like a square after a rotation by $5^\circ$, but, by definition, this is a different square, mathematically a different set of points. Hence, a rotation by $5^\circ$ is no symmetry of the square.+A counter-example is a rotation by, say $5^{\circ}$. The upper-right corner point $A$ of the square is obviously mapped to a point $A'$ outside of the initial set. Of course, a square still looks like a square after a rotation by $5^\circ$, but, by definition, this is a different square, mathematically a different set of points. Hence, a rotation by $5^{\circ}$ is no symmetry of the square.
  
-A characteristic property of the symmetries of the square is that the combination of two transformations that leave the square invariant is again a symmetry. For example, combining a rotation by $90^\circ$ and $180^\circ$ is equivalent to a rotation of $270^\circ$,​ which is again a symmetry of the square. We will elaborate on this in the next post. In fact, the basic axioms of group theory can be derived from such an easy example.+A characteristic property of the symmetries of the square is that the combination of two transformations that leave the square invariant is again a symmetry. For example, combining a rotation by $90^{\circ}$ and $180^{\circ}$ is equivalent to a rotation of $270^{\circ}$, which is again a symmetry of the square. We will elaborate on this in the next post. In fact, the basic axioms of group theory can be derived from such an easy example.
  
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advanced_tools/group_theory.1523605360.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/04/13 07:42 by bogumilvidovic